ForsythCounty GhostTour

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Timeline Photos

www.exploregeorgia.org

July 4th Celebration | Cumming, Georgia

http://www.exploregeorgia.org/listing/6564-july-4th-celebration

www.exploregeorgia.org The City of Cumming's Independence Day Celebration begins on July 3 at 6 p.m. with food and drink vendors, inflatables for kids, a live band, a fireworks display and an all-age dance contest following

[05/16/16]   Long Swamp Tribe

The Long Swamp tribe was a large Cherokee Indian tribe consisting of about eight families who lived on Long Swamp Creek about one mile east of Ball Ground, Georgia. This was another of the many Cherokee tribes that lived on the gold belt that ran through the Cherokee Nation. Some of these Indians were very wealthy in gold.

The chief of the Long Swamp Tribe and all his subjects were in alliance with Chief Rising Fawn and the other tribes that hid their treasures in the secret tunnel. This tribe lived in a village of log cabin homes in a large bottom field at the intersection of Long Swamp Creek and the Etowah River; a few scattered homes along and up the creek for about two miles to the vicinity of the Sam Freeman old mill site to where the winding creek forms the perfect image of a flying eagle. Here on the tip of the eagle's wing is a large Indian-made structure made from water-worn stones (gravel) erected in a flat area extending from the east bank of the creek to the base of a hill. The stone structure is mounted and is in the perfect image of a giant boat paddle about two hundred feet long.

Source: Cry of the Eagle
Author: Forest C. Wade

Timeline Photos

[03/29/16]   CHIEF HENRY VICKERY

Henry Vickery was a Cherokee tribal chief who lived with his tribe on the headwaters of Vickery Creek in present Forsyth County. He married Charlotte Cordery. Henry Vickery and Jacob Scudder were reputed to be very close friends. Chief Vickery died in the early 1830's, just a few years before the removal.

Source: Cry of the Eagle History and Legends of the Cherokee Indians and their buried treasure
Author: Forest C. Wade

[03/22/16]   SUWANEE OLD TOWN

Interpretations of the meaning and origin of the word "Suwanee" vary somewhat. It may have been coined from Skwa'ni, a Creek (Muskogean) word applied to a group of Shawnees who settled along the river during the time of the American Revolution. Or it may have come from the word savannah or savanni, the name used by early Spanish explorers to refer to Indian tribes living along a river. Suwanee Old Town, a village occupied principally by Cherokees, extended along the Chattahoochee River in Forsyth and Gwinnett counties. Maps of the area drawn in 1829, when Georgia was attempting to establish the true boundary between the ceded Creek lands and the Cherokees, place the village site in the Collins Ferry area.

Source: Pioneer History of Forsyth County 1832 -1860
Author: Don L. Shadburn

[03/15/16]   SHELTONVILLE

A postal community in the 1st Land District, on the Collins (McGinnis) Ferry Road, and later called "Shakerag" by local people. Vardy B. Shelton, a merchant, was the first postmaster when mail service was established in 1848.

Source: Pioneer History of Forsyth County 1832-1860
Author: Don L. Shadburn

[03/08/16]   YOUNG DEER CREEK

Name of a stream which flows southward into the Chattahoochee River within the 14th District. The creek was so called for Young Deer (Ahwi'nita), a Cherokee native who lived in a cabin near the stream for many years before district surveys of the land were made in 1832. Sometime in the 1820's Young Deer moved to Allatoona.

Source: Pioneer History of Forsyth County 1832-1860 Vol. 1
Author: Don L. Shadburn

[02/22/16]   Chief Settendown

Very little is known about Chief Settendown. He had a home on the south side of Settendown Creek in the present Matt Community about one mile from Matt on the Matt and Cumming highway. The chief was named after the creek on which he lived.

Chief Settendown had three sons. Two were named Nickel and Tassel Sucker, and the name of the third is yet to be discovered by the author.

The chief and his group were one of the many small tribes that comprised the whole of the Hightower Indians.

Chief Settendown and his subjects submitted to the white man's governmental powers and went west on the "Trail of Tears." Before leaving, however, they, like other Hightower tribes under Rising Fawn's rule, stored their personal wealth within the secret treasure tunnel.

Source: Cry of the Eagle
Author: Forest C. Wade

[02/15/16]   Chief Rising Fawn (The Old Warrior)

Chief Rising Fawn was a prominent chief of the Hightower area with several chiefs of lower rank under his rule. He had jurisdiction over a large section of the Cherokee Nation and was a member of the Cherokee National Council. His rule included sizable portions of what is now Cherokee, Forsyth, and Dawson Counties. "The Old Warrior", as he was known, owned a home and improvements and had a wife and twelve children on Shoal Creek in present-day Dawson County.

He also owned a home and improvements and had a wife and five children on the headwaters of Little River (now Cherokee County) in the vicinity of Freeman Mill. In addition he owned a home and improvements and had a wife and family on Settendown Creek in Chreokee County near the Downing Ferry Road close to the present Cherokee-Forsyth County line. Among his holdings were several forty-acre lots, a water-powered grist mill on the headwaters of Little River, and a number of slaves who were occupied in farming and gold mining.

One of his three wives was Elizabeth Jones, who had previously been married to John Rattlingourd. (Elizabeth Jones was removed to the west and later married Henry Blalock.)

Rising Fawn was reportedly the wealthiest Indian within the Settlement in both real estate and gold.

Rising Fawn went west with his subjects on the "Trail of Tears".

Note: Rising Fawn was one of four district chieftains presiding over the Coosawattee district of the Cherokee Indian Nation, and he was a member of the Cherokee's National Council. The Coosawattee District began at the headwaters of the Coosawattee River and extended south to the Chattahoochee River.

Source: Cry of the Eagle
Author: Forest C. Wade

siprinvestigations.com

www.siprinvestigations.com

Please feel free to message us with any questions you may have and we will try and answer to the best of our ability. We also encourage you to post on our site as long as it is ghost or paranormal related. If you are seeking a paranormal investigation group we highly recommend Southeastern Institute of Paranormal Research. Here is the link to this groups website
http://www.siprinvestigations.com/

siprinvestigations.com

[02/08/16]   I found an Eagle carved on an oak
He answered my questions, yet he never spoke.
Far into the past information I seek
Then I found other signs where he pointed his beak.

Source: Cry of the Eagle
Author: Forest C. Wade

[01/19/16]   We are working on a new line up, this month, to post for each week. We will begin posting again on February 1st. Thank you for your patience and please feel free to contact us at anytime. We hope everyone is having a great start to this year.

Welcome 2016!!!!

Happy New Year's from all of us at the Forsyth County Ghost Tour!!! We hope you have a Safe and Happy Holiday!!

We hope everyone has a safe and very Merry Christmas!!!!

Merry Christmas Eve!!!!

theparisreview.org

Ghosts on the Nog

Terrifying Tales Tuesday:

http://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2014/12/19/ghosts-on-the-nog/

theparisreview.org The great English tradition of Christmas ghost stories. One of John Leech’s illustrations for A Christmas Carol, 1842. I’ve long thought of Christmastime as a season of mostly pleasant intrusions: thirty or so days of remembering to tend, checklist style, to the latest pressing bit of Yuletide busin…

Moment of Silence Sunday:
If everyone would please take a moment of silence today to show respect for those who have passed on.

Supernatural Saturday: James Habersham House

Savannah's Olde Pink House was so named for the beautiful shade of "pink" stucco, which covers its old brick.

This Georgian mansion was built in 1771 for James Habersham Jr., one of Savannah's most important early cotton factors and founding-family members. The lot was originally a land grant from the British Crown. The building is a fine example of colonial architecture, and one of the few buildings to survive the fire of 1796.

Of particular interest is the Greek portico with a beautiful Palladian window above. The fanlight over the front door is one of the oldest in Georgia. The interior features a lovely but simple Georgian stairway.

The Bolton family, sister and brother-in law of architect William Jay, occupied the house from 1804 to 1812. Between 1812 and 1865, the house was home to the Planter's Bank and First Bank of Georgia. It also served as headquarters for Union General Zebulon York in 1865. One of the early restorations, it is now home to an elegant restaurant and cellar tavern beneath. The restaurant is well known for their romantic dinners.

The Olde Pink House is popular destination for Savannah ghost hunters. Patrons of this restaurant and tavern claim to have found themselves in conversation with James Habersham Jr., who supposedly hanged himself in the basement in 1799. It is said that his restless spirit frequently wanders around his old home and who appears to staff at the house between the months of October and March. There are also several mischievous entities that like to play pranks on unsuspecting patrons of The Olde Pink House.

[12/18/15]   Fun Fact Friday: Coal Mountain
Settlers/investors were lured to this area by untrue tales of coal deposits in a non-existent mountain.

Source: Footsteps...A walking tour of Cumming with Points of Interest in Forsyth County, Georgia

Author: Irene Doehring and Karen Markette

[12/17/15]   Terrifying topic Thursday:
It's your turn!! Share your ghost stories and/or experiences with us! We'd love to hear from you! Post it here in the comments or message us!

paranormalsocieties.com

List of Paranormal Societies, Paranormal Society Directory, Paranormal Investigators, Ghost Hunters

Wicked Wednesday:

http://www.paranormalsocieties.com/

paranormalsocieties.com

mysteriousuniverse.org

Mysteries and Death at Georgia’s Cursed Lake | Mysterious Universe

Terrifying Tales Tuesday: Georgia's Cursed Lake

http://mysteriousuniverse.org/2015/12/mysteries-and-death-at-georgias-cursed-lake/

mysteriousuniverse.org Some places in this world seem mysterious to the point where they almost seem to be beyond the comprehension of mankind. There are mysteries in these places that defy any attempts to explain them, and the very soil and water itself here seems to reverberate with some evil force that pervades its ver…

[12/14/15]   People, Places, and Historical Monument Monday:

The site of Brown's Bridge was near the old Goddard's Ferry, where white traders crossed the Chattahoochee River into Cherokee Indian territory en route from Hall county to points west. A road was constructed to connect the settlement near the ford to the Federal Road. Probably the first bridge ever built over the river was on the property of Minor Winn Brown, who resided in the area before 1830 and who subsequently became a Gainesville postmaster and merchant. Brown was authorized to build a toll bridge at the site of the ford in 1839. The span across the Chattahoochee would have to be replaced several times as a result of destruction by natural forces. The owner of the bridge in 1898, Bester Allen, sold the span to Hall and Forsyth Counties, and it thus became toll free.

Source: Images of America Forsyth county twentieth century changes
Author: Annette Bramblett

Moment of Silence Sunday:
If everyone would please take a moment of silence today to show respect for those who have passed on.

Supernatural Saturday: Bhangarh Fort, Bhangarh, India

Built in the early 1600s by King Sawai Madho Singh, this fort protected a small city of roughly 10,000 people and included a royal palace. According to legend, a sorcerer fell in love with the King’s daughter and in the process of trying to seduce her, he died, cursing the town to be destroyed. Shortly thereafter, an invading army destroyed the fort and killed virtually everyone who lived there. Locals refuse to live anywhere near the ruins, and have ensured that it’s closed after dark due to the presence of various ghosts that have been reported roaming through the complex. There have been cases where people have been at the fort at night, only to turn up dead in the morning.

[12/11/15]   Fun Fact Friday: Chestatee

Cherokee origination, meaning fire-light or place of lights.

Source: Footsteps...A walking tour of Cumming with points of interest in Forsyth county, Georgia
Author: Irene Doehring and Karen Markette

[12/10/15]   Terrifying topic Thursday:
It's your turn!! Share your ghost stories and/or experiences with us! We'd love to hear from you! Post it here in the comments or message us!

[12/09/15]   Wicked Wednesday: How to Find Haunted Places

It’s usually easy to find good places for ghost hunting. Ask your friends, and people who’ve grown up in the area.
(However, remember that some people don’t like to talk about ghosts and haunted places. They think that it’s ‘bad luck’ or it’s against their religious beliefs. If the person seems unhappy with the topic, drop it immediately.)

Most people are happy to talk — and joke — about ghosts, ghost-related TV shows, and haunted places they know about. If encouraged, they might share their own story about a ghostly encounter, too.

Start the conversation with TV shows

Many ghost-related TV shows are popular now, so that’s usually the best place to start. Focus on any popular ghost TV show you’ve seen.

Ask, ‘Do you watch the Ghost Hunters TV show?’ (A lot of people have watched that or Ghost Adventures.)

If the person replies with a firm or icy ‘No’, drop the subject.

If the person has watched the show, you can ask if they’ve ever heard of a haunted place nearby. (If they seem interested, ask if they’d like to explore a few haunted places with you, so you don’t go ghost hunting alone.)

At Halloween

The week before Halloween, almost every local newspaper runs a story related to a local, haunted place. This gives you several opportunities to learn about haunted places.

Ask your friends if the location an the article is really haunted. Ask if they’ve ever heard of other haunted places nearby. Chances are, they’ll remember other spooky locations, or know someone with a haunted house.

Visit the place that was mentioned by the newspaper. The best time to visit – besides Halloween – is during a weekend afternoon. Other people are likely to be there, looking for evidence of ghosts. In my experience, those people are likely to be chatty and know a few other local places that are haunted. Take notes!

(Also ask if they know any local ghost hunting groups, and if those groups are good.)

Terrifying Tales Tuesday: WALT DISNEY'S GHOST STILL LEAVES THE LIGHT ON

When you enter Disneyland, not long after you pass through the entrance on Main Street, you will see the Fire House to your left. Walt Disney himself used to have an apartment on the second floor of the Fire House, and he would stay there often, hosting various VIPs and celebrities as his personal guests. Whenever he was staying at the apartment, he'd light the lamp in the second story window to let people know he was in residence.

Apparently, it became his permanent residence as his spirit never left.

The story says that a member of the custodial staff was cleaning the apartment shortly after Walt Disney had passed away, and turned the lamp off as she left and locked up. When she got outside, she looked up to see that the lamp was still on. Thinking she might have forgotten, she went back inside and turned it off a second time. When she looked up at the window, the same thing happened - the lamp was on again. So she returned to the apartment one more time, but didn't leave after turning off the lamp. Immediately, she heard a clicking sound and the lamp turned itself back on right in front of her. She ran out of the apartment screaming, and ever since, the park has kept the lamp burning as a tribute to Walt Disney, still watching over his life's work that he loved.

To this day, cast members report they can hear footsteps and knocking coming from inside the apartment, and occasionally from the corner of their eye, they'll see the curtains twitch and a brief flash of someone stepping back from the window.

[12/07/15]   People, Places, and Historical Monument Monday: Roper Hardware

In 1948, Mr. and Mrs. William McKinley Roper bought the store building on the west side of the square from the Bank of Cumming. "Mac" and Fern Roper organized and operated W.M. Roper Hardware Company, one of the primary businesses in Cumming.
Customers enjoyed a congenial atmosphere when going into the store which Mac said, "handled everything from knittin' needles to farm tractors". A trip to Roper's was like a visit with friendly neighbors. If you were not sure of what you needed, Mac knew the answer to your dilemma. He could furnish the materials you needed plus a run-down on the latest news in town.
In June of 1961 the store was destroyed in a fire which swept over most of the block. One unusual feature of the store at the time was a sign. The large sign was placed at the exit to the store and said " Thank you for trading with us!" Fern said that persons would read the sign when starting to leave and would turn back and say, "You're Welcome. We are glad we came."
One person remembers the sign, Roper Hardware Co., on the building which looked as if it had been written with an extended long rope.
Following the fire, the Ropers built a new building on the site.
After Mac's death in 1981, the Ropers' daughter, Mary Kathryn, and her husband, Ivan Sibley, moved here and became the owner and operators of the business. The store had a face lift and is now a Sentry-Bluegrass Hardware dealership.
As Ivan and Mary Kathryn recently said "Some merchandise lines have changed. We now carry Benjamin Moore Paints. We have grown to keep up with the growth in Cumming and Forsyth County." The one thing that has not changed is that personal, caring service and attention that every customer deserves.
Yet another generations saying, "You can get it at Roper's".
Their slogan is, "We welcome the opportunity to be of service with quality paints and hardware."
Today, the sign out front as you exit says, "Thank you, please come back."

Source: Stroll Around the Square in Cumming
Author: Gladyse K. Barrett

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